MEMETERIA by Thomas May

Music & the Arts

14 Ways of Describing the Rain

Here, the experimental film from 1929 by Joris Ivens to which Hanns Eisler wrote his Op. 70 variations-score in 1941 (Vierzehn Arten den Regen zu beschreiben, in homage to his mentor on Schoenberg’s 70th birthday), using a Pierrot lunaire ensemble. This is what Daniel Barenboim selected to open the Boulez Saal’s first-anniversary concert on Sunday (alongside Schubert’s Introduktion und Variationen über Trockne Blumen and Pierrot lunaire itself).

The project inspired Theodor Adorno to collaborate with Eisler during their American exile in the 1940s on the short but potent book that first appeared in English as Composing for the Films (sic).

Eisler remarks:

What has brought about this research project is the question raised in recent years by musicians everywhere–is it really necessary to continue the current Hollywood practice of rehashing “original” scores with crumbs picked from the table of Tchaikowsky, Debussy, Ravel, Richard Strauss and Stravinsky? Is a new musical material possible? May it not even be more useful and effective?

Not hard to transpose that into our situation today…

Filed under: aesthetics, film music, Hanns Eisler, Uncategorized

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