MEMETERIA by Thomas May

Music & the Arts

The Devastating Loss in Brazil

From Ed Yong, this assessment of the devastating losses in the aftermath of the conflagration that destroyed the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro:

The museum’s archeological collection had frescoes from Pompeii, and hundreds of Egyptian artifacts, including a 2,700-year-old painted sarcophagus. It housed art and ceramics from indigenous Brazilian cultures, some of whose populations number only in their thousands. It contained audio recordings of indigenous languages, some of which are no longer spoken; entire tongues went up in flames. It carried about 1,800 South American artifacts that dated back to precolonial times, including urns, statues, weapons, and a Chilean mummy that was at least 3,500 years old.

Owen Burdick reports this in a Facebook post:

Incalculable loss:
“There’s nothing left from the Linguistics division. We lost all the indigenous languages collection: the recordings since 1958, the chants in all the languages for which there are no native speakers alive anymore, the Curt Niemuendaju archives: papers, photos, negatives, the original ethnic-historic-linguistic map localizing all the ethnic groups in Brazil, the only record that we had from 1945. The ethnological and archeological references of all ethnic groups in Brazil since the 16th century… An irreparable loss of our historic memory. It just hurts so much to see all in ashes.”

Cinda Gonda, translated by Diogo Almeida, about the fire at Brazil’s National Museum.

Filed under: miscellaneous

The Einstein Theory of Relativity 1923 SD

Filed under: miscellaneous

A Trip Through New York City in 1911

Originally filmed by SF Studios, a Swedish company. Sound of course added on.

Filed under: film, miscellaneous

Meet the Flintstones

Remarkable work by Ilan Rechtman. I need to find out more about him.

Filed under: miscellaneous, piano

Music for a New Year

Also for New Year’s:
https://www.swr.de/swr2/programm/sendungen/konzerte/31/-/id=659392/did=20775768/nid=659392/1rypgzr/index.html
Joseph Haydn:
“Die Schöpfung”, Oratorium Hob. XXI:2
(Zeitversetzte Übertragung aus dem Konzerthaus Freiburg)

Filed under: Bartók, miscellaneous

Madrona Makes Music: Holiday Benefit

15171279_1140663509388714_7755008786534566943_n

Local readers please note this concert scheduled for Saturday 10 December, 3-4 pm, by the musicians of Madrona to benefit their neighborhood’s homeless shelter, Julia’s Place.

From the announcement: “These local performers, including accomplished professionals and aspiring young artists, present a holiday extravaganza that covers everything from Mozart and Schubert to Stevie Wonder and Leonard Cohen. Guests of all ages are welcome at this free community concert, and every donation collected goes directly to Julia’s Place to assist vulnerable families!”

Madrona Makes Music is presented by local violin studio Suzuki by the Sound

Performer lineup:

–Distilled, Seattle University alumni a cappella choir
-Aaron Grad, electric theorbo
-Tracy Hagen, cello
-Jen Kovarovic, violin
-Lizzie and Aimee
-Nelda & Clif’s little BIG band
-Rabbi David Basior
-Lewis Thompson, piano
-Violin students of Suzuki by the Sound

Filed under: miscellaneous

The Legend of Sawney Bean

sawney-bean

The things one learns while traveling…. This made for some good tale-spinning while visiting Edinburgh:

The story of Sawney Bean is one of the most gruesome Scottish legends, the plot of which would not look out of place in any modern horror/slasher movie. Evidence suggests the tale dates to the early 18th century.

more on the gruesome legend of the Bean clan

Bonus scare:

Filed under: miscellaneous, travel

Songs My Mother Taught Me

Filed under: miscellaneous

Music for Good Friday

Filed under: miscellaneous

Guten Rutsch!

For my non-German-speaking friends, here’s a quickie intro to this NYE idiom: “In English, the phrase would be ‘Happy New Year,’ but Guten Rutsch literally translates to ‘Good jump’ or ‘Good slide.'”

I suppose a leap of faith always is involved in trying to brush aside the bad memories of a year just passed and to greet the new one as a “blank slate.”

On the other hand, the nostalgic tendency to think about old friends, old times, is a quintessential part of the New Year’s experience. Here’s Matthew Iglesias on the connection between Robert Burns’s beloved “Auld Lang Syne” and NYE:

The speaker is asking whether old friends should be forgotten, as a way of stating that obviously one should not forget one’s old friends. The version of the song we sing today is based on a poem published by Robert Burns, which he attributed to “an old man’s singing,” noting that it was a traditional Scottish song

[…]

One reason a random Scottish folk song has come to be synonymous with the new year is that New Year’s celebrations (known as Hogmanay) loom unusually large in Scottish folk culture … Presbyterianism put down deeper roots in Scotland, leading Hogmanay to displace Christmas as the number one midwinter celebration.

[…]

An 18th-century Scottish ballad … became a midcentury American television ritual, and from there became a worldwide phenomenon — even though almost nobody understands the song.

 

 

Filed under: miscellaneous, poetry

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

RSS Arts & Culture Stories from NPR