MEMETERIA by Thomas May

Music & the Arts

Seattle Chamber Music Society’s 35th Summer Festival

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Cynthia Phelps is a regular participant in the Seattle Chamber Music Society’s Summer Festival.

Tonight the 2016 edition of the Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival begins, with James Ehnes and his colleagues fresh from a Beethoven quartet marathon in Seoul. My preview has been posted on the Seattle Times website:

“Chamber music is about being able to trust your colleagues,” says violist Cynthia Phelps. That’s what enables the risk-taking that’s essential for this intimate musical medium, she explains. “And the chance to live and work together during the Summer Festival is a wonderful model for building that trust.”

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Filed under: chamber music, James Ehnes, Seattle Chamber Music Society

Happy Fourth of July!

Filed under: holiday, John Adams

Happy 101st, Randolph Hokanson!

Yesterday’s birthday recital was incredible. Here’s the “set list” Mr. Hokanson played:
Mendelssohn/Three Songs without Words
Schubert/Two Impromptus (G-flat and E-flat major)
Schumann/Two Fantasiestücke Op. 12 (Des Abends and In der Nacht)
Hokanson’s own compositions: two new songs: “Elegy” (Tennyson) and “Nightingales” (Robert Bridges)
Brahms Two Op. 119 Intermezzi (B minor and C major)
Chopin Mazurka in A minor Op. 59, no. 1
Debussy “Beau Soir” in Heifetz transcription
Albeníz tango in Kreisler transcription
Gershwin “It Ain’t Necessarily So” and Prelude for Piano 3 transcriptions by Heifetz
Guest soloists: mezzo Sarah Mattox and violinist Marjorie Kransberg-Talvi

MEMETERIA by Thomas May

hokanson Randolph Hokanson with pianist Judith Cohen – a day before he turned 100 (photo by Thomas May)

This is a belated birthday salute, as Mr. Randolph Hokanson’s actual birthday happened on 22 June. He’s now into his second century. Today I’ll be attending a recital by Mr. Hokanson. In honor of the occasion, here’s a profile I wrote a couple of years ago about this remarkable pianist (also at work as a composer these days):

“I’ve seen it all!” announces Randolph Hokanson before losing himself in a mischievous gale of laughter. With someone else, you might be tempted to indulge that as hyperbole. With Hokanson, who was born in 1915 in Bellingham, it’s tempting to take it literally.
This gifted pianist and teacher has witnessed almost a century of not just ceaseless but accelerating change: epochal shifts in technology, in education, in how music and the arts are valued.

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Happy 101st, Randolph Hokanson!

hokanson

Randolph Hokanson with pianist Judith Cohen – a day before he turned 100 (photo by Thomas May)

This is a belated birthday salute, as Mr. Randolph Hokanson’s actual birthday happened on 22 June. He’s now into his second century. Today I’ll be attending a recital by Mr. Hokanson. In honor of the occasion, here’s a profile I wrote a couple of years ago about this remarkable pianist (also at work as a composer these days):

“I’ve seen it all!” announces Randolph Hokanson before losing himself in a mischievous gale of laughter. With someone else, you might be tempted to indulge that as hyperbole. With Hokanson, who was born in 1915 in Bellingham, it’s tempting to take it literally.
This gifted pianist and teacher has witnessed almost a century of not just ceaseless but accelerating change: epochal shifts in technology, in education, in how music and the arts are valued.

continue reading

Filed under: anniversary, pianists

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